Posts for: April, 2014

By Denmark Family Dentistry
April 17, 2014
Category: Oral Health
OliviaNewton-JohnRecallsDaughtersTeethingTroubles

Singer Olivia Newton-John's daughter Chloe is now a lovely, grown woman, but Olivia recently recounted to Dear Doctor magazine a rather creative method she found to sooth Chloe's teething troubles many years ago.

“When Chloe was a baby and teething I remember using a frozen bagel for her sore gums,” Olivia said. “She loved it!”

Cold is often very soothing to a teething child's gums. In fact, the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) recommends using a clean, chilled, rubber teething ring, or cold wet washcloth. Chilled pacifiers can also be helpful. Be sure not to freeze teething rings or pacifiers as ice can actually burn sensitive mouth tissues.

Older teethers can sometimes find relieve from cold foods such as popsicles (or bagels!) but make sure your child eats these sugar-containing foods only at mealtimes so as not to promote tooth decay.

If your baby has not yet begun the teething (or tooth-eruption) process, you can expect it to begin usually between six and nine months. It may, however, start as early as three months or as late as twelve months.

Teething symptoms vary among children, as does the length of time it takes for a tooth to make its appearance. But many parents notice the following signs:

  • Irritability
  • Biting and gnawing
  • Gum swelling
  • Chin (facial) rash
  • Disrupted sleeping patterns
  • Ear rubbing
  • Drooling
  • Decreased appetite

These symptoms are usually most bothersome during the week that the tooth is breaking (erupting) through the gums, starting about four days before and lasting about three days after the tooth appears.

Occasionally, teething discomfort can be considerable. If that is the case with your baby, you can give her or him acetaminophen or ibuprofen in the appropriate dose (check with your pharmacist if you're not sure what that is). The medicine should be swallowed — not massaged into the gums, as this can also burn. Numbing agents should not be used for children under 2, except under the advice and supervision of a healthcare professional.

If you would like to learn more about teething or any other child-related oral health issue, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. If you would like to read Dear Doctor's entire interview with Olivia Newton-John, please see “Olivia Newton-John.” Dear Doctor also has more on “Teething Troubles.”


PatientsonBloodThinnersRequirePrecautionsBeforeandDuringOralSurgery

The proliferation of drugs to treat all manner of diseases and conditions has heightened concerns not only about general side effects, but also how a particular drug may affect treatments for other conditions. There are indications, for example, that drugs classified as blood thinners could cause complications for patients undergoing oral surgery.

Blood thinners like Warfarin are typically prescribed to patients with artificial heart valves or who are at significant risk for stroke, heart attack, or the formation of clots that could potentially damage the heart and lungs. The drug reduces the coagulation (clotting) mechanism in blood; aspirin taken regularly should also be considered a blood thinner.

As with any invasive procedure, blood thinners can complicate oral surgery. Blood doesn’t clot normally and so bleeding during a procedure is more difficult to stop. This doesn’t necessarily mean the surgery can’t be performed. For one thing, many oral procedures like tooth removal involve little trauma to tissues and bleeding in the hands of a careful and experienced surgeon. The surgeon can also use hemostatic agents during surgery that will stabilize blood clotting, as well as suturing the incision in such a way as to reduce bleeding from surface capillaries. In the case of a tooth extraction, a bone graft placed within the empty socket not only reduces bone loss from a missing tooth, but can also enhance bleeding control.

In consultation with your medical doctor, it’s also possible to temporarily stop or reduce your medication dosage in anticipation of a pending oral surgery. While it may not be safe to stop the drug altogether, a reduced dosage can ease the anti-coagulant effect and reduce any complications from bleeding that might occur during the surgery. You can then resume normal dosage soon after the procedure.

During your pre-op examination, it’s important to let your surgeon know about any drugs you are currently taking, including over-the-counter drugs like aspirin. The oral surgeon will then be able to take the necessary steps, including working with your medical doctor, to ensure your surgical procedure is safe and uneventful.

If you would like more information on oral surgery precautions while taking blood thinners and other medication, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Oral Surgery & Blood Thinners.”




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Denmark, WI  54208

 

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