By Denmark Family Dentistry
February 12, 2022
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implant  
WhatsInvolvedinGettingaDentalImplant

Although the term "surgery" is broad enough to drive a proverbial truck through, we can roughly categorize procedures as either major or minor. Installing an implant is decidedly in the minor column.

Akin to having a tooth extraction, implant surgery can be done painlessly in a dentist's office with very little discomfort afterward. If you're considering a dental implant, going through this surgical procedure shouldn't worry you.

Still, it's hard not to feel a little nervous about any type of surgery, even one as minor as getting an implant. That's where shining a little more light in the way of information can help dissolve any lingering anxiety. Here, then, is an overview of dental implant surgery from start to finish.

First, a little planning. Preparation beforehand helps eliminate any potential snags during surgery. During earlier visits, your dentist will completely map out the procedure with x-rays or CT scanning of your jaws to locate any obstacles, followed by the preparation of a surgical guide placed in the mouth to direct drilling.

Numbing the pain. The dentist begins the surgery by completely deadening the area with local anesthesia. This is usually done with an anesthetic swab of the surface gums to numb the needle prick, which is then used to deliver the remaining anesthetic to the deeper tissues and bone.

Creating the channel. After ensuring the area is fully anesthetized, the dentist will expose the bone by making small incisions in the gums. Then, using the surgical guide, they'll drill a small hole, incrementally enlarging it until it matches the size of the implant post.

Installing the implant. After drilling, the dentist removes the implant from its sterile packaging and directly places it into the prepared channel. The dentist then ensures the implant positioning is correct, often checking with additional x-rays. They'll then suture the gums back into place to protect the implant.

You may initially have a few days of mild discomfort, usually manageable with over-the-counter pain relievers. Over the next few weeks new bone cells will form and adhere to the implant to create a durable bond. You'll then be ready for the attachment of a life-like crown.

Surgery is one step in a long process. But it's an important step—and with the resulting smile outcome, well worth it.

If you would like more information on dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implant Surgery.”

By Denmark Family Dentistry
February 02, 2022
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: cosmetic dentistry  
4PathwaysForAchievingaMoreConfidentSmile

When you look in the mirror, are you happy with what you see? Many of us aren't, fretting over our weight, our hair color, our nose shape or some other aspect of our physical appearance. And, many are also frustrated with what they perceive to be a less-than-desirable smile.

If your smile embarrasses you to the point that you want to hide it, that can do a number on your self-esteem. In turn, it could put a damper on your career, your social relationships or your love life.

But taking steps to transform your smile could set in motion the opposite effect—a renewed sense of confidence. In recognition of International Boost Your Self-Esteem Month in February, here are 4 pathways to a smile you're confident to share with others.

Dental bonding. Does that chipped front tooth drive you crazy? You might be surprised how easy it is to eliminate a chip or other defect with dental bonding. We begin by applying a resin-based material, matched to your natural tooth color, to the area of defect. Once we've sculpted and cured the successive layers of applied material to achieve the desired shape, you'll have a "new" flawless tooth to enhance your smile.

Veneers or crowns. There are assorted dental defects like chips, discoloration or gaps that we can effectively hide with porcelain veneers. These thin shells of dental material, specially shaped and colored to match your natural teeth, are bonded to the visible surface of the teeth. For more extensive defects, a full porcelain crown could completely cover a defective tooth and give it an entirely new look.

Orthodontics. Your otherwise perfect teeth may be misaligned, giving you a "crooked" smile. But you can have a straighter, more attractive smile with the help of orthodontics. There are basically two routes you can take: fixed braces or, if your bite problem allows it, removable clear aligners. And, as long as you and your mouth are reasonably healthy, you can have your smile straightened at any age.

Dental implants. Sometimes a smile problem isn't flawed teeth, but no teeth at all. Fortunately, there are a number of ways to replace missing teeth, with dental implants at the top of the list. We imbed the implant's titanium post into the jawbone to create a secure hold. After attaching a life-like crown, you'll once again have an attractive tooth that can last for years, if not decades.

So, what changes would you like to make to your smile? After an initial examination, we can discuss your options. The boost to your confidence and self-esteem through smile enhancement could be well worth the effort.

If you would like more information about changing your smile, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Cosmetic Dentistry.”

By Denmark Family Dentistry
January 23, 2022
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: celebrity smiles   crowns  
HowCelineDionOvercameHerSmileObstacle

For over three decades, Celine Dion has amazed audiences and fans with her powerful singing voice. Best known for her recording of "My Heart Will Go On," the theme song for the movie Titanic, Dion has amassed global record sales topping 200 million. In her early singing days, though, she struggled with one particular career obstacle: an unattractive smile.

The Canadian-born performer had a number of dental defects including crooked and discolored teeth, and—most prominent of all—abnormally large cuspid or "canine" teeth (located on either side of the four front incisors). They were so noticeable that one Quebec celebrity magazine gave her the unflattering nickname "Canine Dion."

This isn't an unusual problem. Since human canines are already the longest teeth in the mouth, it doesn't take much for them to stand out. Our ancient hunter-gatherer ancestors needed these large, pointed teeth to survive. But with the evolution of agriculture and industry, canine teeth have become gradually smaller—so much so that when they're abnormally large, they don't look right in a smile.

So, what can be done if your canines embarrassingly stand out from the rest? Here are some of the options to consider.

Reduce their size. If your canines are just a tad too long, it may be possible to remove some of the enamel layer in a procedure called contouring. Using this technique, we can reduce a tooth's overall size, which we then re-shape by bonding composite resin to the tooth. It's only a good option, though, if your canines have an ample and healthy layer of enamel.

Repair other teeth. The problem of prominent canine teeth may actually be caused by neighboring teeth. When the teeth next to the canines are crooked, the canines can appear more prominent. Alternatively, other teeth around the canines may be abnormally small. Braces or clear aligners can correct crooked incisors, and applying porcelain veneers to smaller teeth could help normalize their length.

Apply dental crowns. In some instances, we can reduce the canines in size and then bond porcelain crowns to them. This is the option that Dion ultimately chose. The natural teeth are still intact, but the crowning process transforms them into properly proportioned, life-like teeth. There is, however, one caveat: The alteration to these teeth will be permanent, so they will need a crown from then on.

Besides crowning her canine teeth, Dion also underwent other dental work to straighten and whiten her other teeth. As a result, this superstar performer now has a superstar smile to match and so can you if your teeth are less than perfect. These or other cosmetic enhancements can give you the look you truly desire. All it takes is an initial visit with us to start you on the road to a transformed smile.

If you would like more information about various cosmetic solutions for your smile, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Porcelain Dental Crowns.”

By Denmark Family Dentistry
January 13, 2022
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   pregnancy  
MaintainYourDentalCareDuringPregnancyForYouandYourBaby

Hearing the words, "You're going to have a baby," can change your life—as surely as the next nine months can too. Although an exciting time, pregnancy can be hectic with many things concerning you and your baby's health competing for your attention.

Be sure, then, that you include dental care on your short list of health priorities. It may seem tempting to "put things off" regarding your teeth and gums. But there are good reasons to keep up your dental care—for you and your baby.

For you: a higher risk of dental disease. Hormonal changes during pregnancy can trigger outcomes that increase your dental disease risk. For one, you may encounter cravings that include carbohydrates like sugar. Bacteria feed on sugar, which can cause both tooth decay and gum disease. This change in hormones can also trigger a form of gum disease called pregnancy gingivitis.

For your baby: dental-related complications. Some studies show evidence that a mother's oral bacteria can pass through the placenta and affect the baby. This may in turn spark an inflammatory response in the mother's body, creating potential complications during pregnancy. Other research points to what could result: Women with diseased gums are more likely to deliver premature or underweight babies than those with healthy gums.

Fortunately, you can minimize dental disease during pregnancy and protect both you and your baby.

  • Keep up regular dental cleanings and checkups during pregnancy;
  • Limit consumption of sweets and other sugary foods;
  • Brush and floss every day to remove dental plaque, which feeds bacteria;
  • See your dentist at the first sign of swollen, painful or bleeding gums;  
  • And, inform your dentist that you're pregnant—it could affect your treatment plan.

Although it's wise to put off dental work of a cosmetic or elective nature, you shouldn't postpone essential procedures. Both the American Dental Association and the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists approve of pregnant women undergoing therapeutic dental work.

Dental care during pregnancy shouldn't be an option. Maintaining your oral health could help you and your baby avoid unpleasant complications.

If you would like more information on dental care during pregnancy, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Care During Pregnancy.”

AstheNewYearBeginsHeresaFreshLookattheEffectsofAlcoholonYourOralHealth

Throughout much of the world, January 1st signifies the first day of a brand new year. It's also commemorated by many as National Hangover Day—aptly so, as scores of New Year's Eve celebrants spend the day nursing their headaches and upset stomachs. It may also be an appropriate time to assess the health impact of alcohol—especially on your teeth and gums.

First, the bad news is that immoderate alcohol consumption increases your risk for tooth decay, gum disease and oral cancer. One of the reasons why has to do with sugar found in varying amounts in alcoholic beverages, often included during brewing or distilling to feed the yeast that produce the alcohol. Sugar is a primary food for oral bacteria, which can infect the gums and produce enamel-eroding acid, a prelude to both gum disease and tooth decay.

Along the same lines, alcoholic beverages are often paired with mixers, many of which like sodas and energy drinks contain sugar and high levels of acid. A mixed drink could thus contribute to an even more hostile environment for teeth and gums.

The frequency of your alcohol consumption may also contribute to enamel erosion. Ordinarily, saliva can neutralize oral acid in about thirty minutes to an hour. But saliva can't keep up if you're drinking one round after another, leading to sustained periods of acid contact with the teeth.

Alcohol—or specifically, too much—may also contribute to oral problems. Being under the influence increases your risk for tripping, falling and, shall we say, engaging in fisticuffs, any of which could result in traumatized teeth and gums. And, heavy drinking over a lifetime could increase your risk for oral cancer.

You could avoid these and other outcomes by abstaining from alcohol altogether. But if you do like the occasional wine, beer or spirit, here are a few tips to lower the risk of harm to your mouth, teeth or gums.

Limit your daily consumption. A rule of thumb, according to the Mayo Clinic, is to have no more than two drinks a day if you're a man, one if you're a woman.

Pause between drinks. Rather than downing one drink after another, wait at least an hour before your next round to allow saliva to neutralize any accumulated mouth acid.

Go easy on mixers. While it's fine to indulge in the occasional Old Fashioned or Margarita, choose unmixed beverages like beer, wine or straight spirits more often.

Brush and floss afterward. After a night on the town, don't turn in until you've cleaned your teeth and gums of any residual sugar or acid.

If you would like more information about how alcohol could affect your oral health, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Nutrition—It's Role in General and Oral Health.”





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